“I will cancel the taxes on junk food”: the promise of Liz Truss, who wants to replace Johnson
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“I will cancel the taxes on junk food”: the promise of Liz Truss, who wants to replace Johnson

Lead candidate to replace Boris Johnson has promised she will cancel the junk food taxes introduced to fight obesity.

Stop the taxes on so-called “junk food” and a cut to those imposed on foods and drinks high in fat, salt or sugar. This is the proposal of the Foreign Minister and candidate for leadership of the British Conservatives, Liz Truss, in an interview with the Daily Mail newspaper.

In the UK, there are taxes on the presence of sugar in soft drinks and food. “These taxes are over,” Truss said. According to the minister, British citizens want the government to focus its attention on things like providing good transport, communication infrastructure and cutting NHS waiting lists. “They don’t want the government to tell them what to eat,” the foreign minister said.

Last summer, Britain decided to “declare war” on overly sugary and salty foods as part of a campaign against obesity. The rule was included in the National Food Strategy, a dossier wanted by the Johnson government and drawn up by a commission coordinated by Henry Dimbleby, the founder of Leon, a sustainable and healthy fast-food chain.

The sugar tax amounted to £ 3 per kilo, the salt tax to £ 6, and the executive’s aim was to raise around € 4 billion a year, a sum that should have allowed general practitioners to prescribe their fruit and vegetable patients, as well as cooking classes. The purpose of the initiative was to educate the population to follow a correct diet by counteracting the decline in conditions of millions of citizens: according to the National Food Strategy, in fact, eating unhealthy food contributes to the death of 64 thousand people a year and imposes an increase cost to the NHS of 74 billion pounds. Also, according to the dossier, there are 13 million obese adults in Great Britain, a figure that has doubled over the last twenty years.