Prime Minister Sanchez and the tie, casual choices for environmental protection
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Prime Minister Sanchez and the tie, casual choices for environmental protection

The invitation to employees is to dress more informally so as not to waste the increasingly expensive energy. Among other proposals, air conditioning at no less than 27 degrees and heating at 19 degrees in public places

Casual for the environment: the latest appeal to wear more informal clothing in the summer came from the Spanish Prime Minister, Pedro Sanchez, who on Friday evening showed up at the press conference without a tie and invited his compatriots to follow his example in view of the energy saving measures plan that Madrid is preparing to launch.

“I asked the ministers, all public employees and I would also like to ask the private sector, if it has not already done so, not to wear a tie when it is not necessary,” said the socialist. Sanchez’s words rang out on a day when it was 36 degrees in Madrid and 39 in Seville.

Other proposals to save energy include air conditioning at no less than 27 degrees and heating at a maximum of 19 degrees in transport, workplaces and shops. According to the Spanish media, this is one of the pillars of the energy efficiency plan that the Spanish government will implement next week.

Spain is not the first country to make this type of choice: since 2005 Japan has been inviting workers to leave their suits at home in the summer with a rise in the temperature in public offices from 25 to 28 and in 2011 it launched the campaign “Super Cool Biz” (translates to ‘super cool business’) to promote casual wear in the hottest periods. In Britain, the recent heat wave prompted the House of Commons to remove the jacket requirement for deputies.

According to the Italian Ministry of Health, removing the tie in hot periods lowers the body temperature by 2-3 degrees and is therefore a simple gesture of enormous impact on the environment. In Italy, as early as 2007, an appeal was launched by the then Minister of Health, Livia Turco, to “all Italian public and private offices to propose to their employees not to use a tie during heat waves”. One of the first Italian companies to promote the renunciation of the tie in the summer was Eni, with an experiment launched in 2007 and continued in the following years with ever greater incisiveness.